James W. Muir

James Muir is an Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Law, as well as the university’s Department of History and Classics. He researches and teaches in the areas of law and colonialism in Canada, British Imperial history, as well as employment and Labour law history. His research has looked at Nova Scotia, including a recent project on the colony’s eighteenth century civil law. In addition to his work on Atlantic Canada, Prof. Muir has looked at legal issues surrounding the natural environment of New Zealand from the mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth centuries. He has also researched labour regulation in eighteenth century Hudson’s Bay Company posts.

Professor Muir can be reached at james.muir@ualberta.ca.

 

Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History Books

Law, Debt and Merchant Power: The Civil Courts of Eighteenth-Century Halifax. (Toronto: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History and University of Toronto Press, 2016)

Property on Trial: Canadian Cases in Context (Toronto: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History and Irwin Law, 2012) (editor with Bruce Ziff, and E. Tucker)

 

Chapters in Osgoode Society Books

‘Michaelmas Term, 1754: The Supreme Court’s First Session’ in Philip Girard, Jim Phillips, & Barry Cahill, eds. The Supreme Court of Nova Scotia 1754-2004: From Imperial Bastion to Provincial Oracle (Toronto: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History and University of Toronto Press, 2004), pp. 259-293, with Jim Phillips.

‘Instrumentalism and the Law of Injuries in Nineteenth-Century Nova Scotia’ in Philip Girard, Jim Phillips, & Barry Cahill, eds. The Supreme Court of Nova Scotia 1754-2004: From Imperial Bastion to Provincial Oracle (Toronto: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History and University of Toronto Press, 2004), pp. 361-391.